Wednesday, September 19, 2007

biblical proportions...

solomon temple by architect thomas ustick walter

thomas ustick walter was one of america's most important architect's of the early to mid 1800's, and played a major role in the founding of the AIA (american institute of architects). walter designed the iconic u.s. capitol dome, as well as the 1843 girard school for orphans - which is largely considered his greatest achievement, and was the most expensive building project in america before the civil war.

most of walter's designs are in a slightly over the top greek revival style, and indeed many of his works of the mid 1800's are hybrid masterpieces of early american and greek designs.

while doing research on walter's work, i came across some very strange architectural drawings he did as teaching aids for a sunday school class he taught for much of his life.

this image of solomon's temple, was based entirely on descriptions from the bible, and compares the scale of the temple with two popular and well known buildings of the time. it's a wonderfully odd and modern looking building that seems totally out of character with most of walter's work, reminding me a bit of some early 20th century italian architectural experiments - the overbearing towers of sant'elia and the austerity of terragni.

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2 Comments:

Blogger the art of memory said...

a very nice image, thnks, never heard of him.
is he in alot of the pencil point magazines?

10:12 AM  
Blogger sroden said...

yeah, pretty lame neither of us knew who designed the capitol dome... ha ha ha... i don't know where the work was or wasn't published, i'm guessing by the early 1920's he was not mentioned much because most of the stuff was major neo classical. this image is an abberation for sure, but there are some others in this group that look even more interesting, but i couldn't find images large enough to see or drag onto my own computer... i might be able to research the real drawings next year if all goes well :-)

10:52 PM  

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